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Research: Comparison of Ugandan and North American Pediatric Surgery Fellows’ Operative Experience: Opportunities for Global Training Exchange.

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Research: Comparison of Ugandan and North American Pediatric Surgery Fellows’ Operative Experience: Opportunities for Global Training Exchange.

J Surg Educ. 2019 Dec 17. pii: S1931-7204(19)30862-1. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2019.12.001. [Epub ahead of print] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31862316

Comparison of Ugandan and North American Pediatric Surgery Fellows’ Operative Experience: Opportunities for Global Training Exchange.

Reed CR1Commander SJ2Sekabira J3Kisa P4Kakembo N4Wesonga A4Langer M5Villanova GA6Ozgediz D7Fitzgerald TN2.

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

North American pediatric surgery training programs vary in exposure to index cases, while controversy exists regarding fellow participation in global surgery rotations. We aimed to compare the case logs of graduating North American pediatric surgery fellows with graduating Ugandan pediatric surgery fellows.

DESIGN:

The pediatric surgery training program at a regional Ugandan hospital hosts a collaboration between Ugandan and North American attending pediatric surgeons. Fellow case logs were compared to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Pediatric Surgery Case Log 2018 to 19 National Data Report.

SETTING:

Mulago National Referral Hospital in Kampala, Uganda; and pediatric surgery training programs in the United States and Canada.

RESULTS:

Three Ugandan fellows completed training and submitted case logs between 2011 and 2019 with a mean of 782.3 index cases, compared to the mean 753 cases in North America. Ugandan fellows performed more procedures for biliary atresia (6.7 versus 4), Wilm’s tumor (23.7 versus 5.7), anorectal malformation (45 versus 15.7), and inguinal hernia (158.7 versus 76.8). North American fellows performed more central line procedures (73.7 versus 30.7), cholecystectomies (27.3 versus 3), extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulations (16 versus 1), and congenital diaphragmatic hernia repairs (16.5 versus 5.3). All cases in Uganda were performed without laparoscopy.

CONCLUSIONS:

Ugandan fellows have access to many index cases. In contrast, North American trainees have more training in laparoscopy and cases requiring critical care. Properly orchestrated exchange rotations may improve education for all trainees, and subsequently improve patient care.

Copyright © 2019 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Medical Knowledge; Practice-Based Learning and Improvement; Systems-Based Practice; fellowship training; global health; global surgery; pediatric surgeryPMID: 31862316 DOI: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2019.12.001

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