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Research: Multidisciplinary approach to paediatric aerodigestive disorders: A single-centre longitudinal observational study

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Research: Multidisciplinary approach to paediatric aerodigestive disorders: A single-centre longitudinal observational study

J Paediatr Child Health

. 2020 Sep 4. doi: 10.1111/jpc.15090. Online ahead of print. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32886957/

Multidisciplinary approach to paediatric aerodigestive disorders: A single-centre longitudinal observational study

Amol Fuladi 1Sadasivam Suresh 1Rahul Thomas 1Matthew Wong 1Sandra Schilling 1Looi Ee 2Kelvin Choo 3Christopher Bourke 3Craig McBride 3Brent I Masters 1 4Nitin Kapur 1 4Affiliations expand

Abstract

Aim: Aerodigestive clinics (ADCs) are multidisciplinary programmes for the care of children with complex congenital or acquired conditions affecting breathing, swallowing and growth. Our objective was to describe the demographic, clinical, etiological and investigational profile of children attending the inaugural ADC at a tertiary paediatric centre in Queensland.

Methods: Children referred to the ADC at Queensland Children’s Hospital from August 2018 to December 2019 were included. Data on clinical, growth and lung function parameters, bronchoscopy and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy findings, thoracic imaging and comorbidities were retrospectively analysed.

Results: Fifty-six children (median (range) age 4 years (3 months-15 years); 18 female) attended the ADC during this 17-month period. Forty-six (82%) children had previous oesophageal atresia with tracheo-oesophageal fistula; 43 of these were type C. Previous isolated oesophageal atresia, congenital diaphragmatic hernia and congenital pulmonary malformation were the underlying disorder in three (5%) children each, with one child having a repaired laryngeal cleft. Vertebral Anal Tracheo Esophageal Renal Limb anomalies (VACTERL)/Vertebral Anal Tracheo Esophageal renal anomalies (VATER) association was seen in 21 (38%) children. Growth was adequate (median weight and body mass index z-score -0.63 and -0.48, respectively). Thirty-four (61%) children reported ongoing wet cough, with 12 (21%) requiring previous hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infection. Fourteen (25%) had bronchiectasis on computed tomography chest and 33 (59%) had clinical tracheomalacia, apparent on bronchoscopic examination in 21 patients. Dysphagia was reported in 15 (27%) children, 11 (20%) were gastrostomy feed-dependent and 5 (9%) had biopsy-proven eosinophilic oesophagitis.

Conclusion: High proportion of children attending the ADC have ongoing respiratory symptoms resulting in chronic pulmonary suppuration and bronchiectasis. Potential benefits of this model of care need to be studied prospectively to better understand the outcomes.

Keywords: aerodigestive clinic; bronchiectasis; tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

© 2020 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

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