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Research: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: An Analysis of the Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network Registry

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Research: Racial and Ethnic Differences in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: An Analysis of the Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network Registry

J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 5. pii: S0022-3476(19)30529-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.04.046. [Epub ahead of print]

Racial and Ethnic Differences in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension: An Analysis of the Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network Registry.

Ong MS1Abman S2Austin ED3Feinstein JA4Hopper RK4Krishnan US5Mullen MP6Natter MD7Raj JU8Rosenzweig EB5Mandl KD7Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Pediatric Pulmonary Vascular Disease Outcomes Bioinformatics Clinical Coordinating Center Investigators.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31176455

Author information

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate racial and ethnic differences in pulmonary hypertension subtypes and survival differences in a pediatric population.

STUDY DESIGN:

This was a retrospective analysis of a cohort of patients with pulmonary hypertension (aged ≤18 years) enrolled in the Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Network registry between 2014 and 2018, comprising patients at eight Pediatric Centers throughout North America (n = 1417).

RESULTS:

Among children diagnosed after the neonatal period, pulmonary arterial hypertension was more prevalent among Asians (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.21-2.79; P = .0045), lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension among blacks (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.48-2.95; P < .0001), idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension among whites (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.06-2.41; P = .0289), and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease among Hispanics (OR, 6.11; 95% CI, 1.34-31.3; P = .0184). Among neonates, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (OR, 4.07; 95% CI, 1.54-10.0; P = .0029) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (OR, 8.11; 95% CI, 3.28-19.8; P < .0001) were more prevalent among blacks, and congenital diaphragmatic hernia was more prevalent among whites (OR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.25-4.18; P = .0070). An increased mortality risk was observed among blacks (HR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.03-3.84; P = .0396), driven primarily by the heightened mortality risk among those with lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension (HR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.15-7.04; P = .0241).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found significant racial variability in the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension subtypes and survival outcomes among children with pulmonary hypertension. Given the substantial burden of this disease, further studies to validate phenotypic differences and to understand the underlying causes of survival disparities between racial and ethnic groups are warranted.

Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.PMID: 31176455 DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.04.046

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