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Research: Study of abdominal wall muscle innervation applied to large-defect closure in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

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Research: Study of abdominal wall muscle innervation applied to large-defect closure in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

Clin Anat. 2019 Oct 17. doi: 10.1002/ca.23503. [Epub ahead of print]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31625184

Study of abdominal wall muscle innervation applied to large-defect closure in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

Cruz ES1,2Rabattu PY1,3Todesco A4Bellier A1Chaffanjon PC1,5Faguet R3Piolat C3Robert Y1,3.

Author information

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In large congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDHs), direct suture of the diaphragm is impossible. Surgeons can use a triangular internal oblique muscle (IOM) plus transverse abdominis muscle (TAM) flap. Its caudal limit faces the medial extremity of the 11th rib. Clinical studies show that the flap is not hypotonic but that the procedure could expose patients already presenting a hypoplastic lung to external oblique muscle (EOM) hypotonia. The aims of this study were to study EOM innervation by the 10th intercostal nerve (ICN) and ICN innervation to the IOM and TAM.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Forty cadaveric abdominal hemi-walls were dissected. The number of branches and the trajectory of each specimen’s 10th ICN were studied medially to the medial extremity of the 11th rib (MEK11) using surgical goggles and a microscope (Carl Zeiss®).

RESULTS:

The 10th ICN was consistently found between the IOM and TAM. There was a median of nine branches from the 10th ICN to the EOM, 77% of them medial to the MEK11 . Median values of nine and 12 branches for the IOM and TAM were found, 60% and 51%, respectively, medial to the MEK11 .

CONCLUSIONS:

These results argue in favor of good innervation to the IOM plus TAM flap but also indicate postoperative abdominal weakness exposing patients to herniation risks, since more than 75% of the branches from the 10th ICN to the EOM were sectioned or pulled away during flap detachment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

congenital diaphragmatic hernia; intercostal nerve; muscular flap; oblique musclePMID: 31625184 DOI: 10.1002/ca.23503

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